Pomona

Pomona is the seventh largest city in Los Angeles County, California. Pomona is located in between the Inland Empire and the San Gabriel Valley. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 149,058. The area was originally occupied by the Tongva or GabrielinoNative Americans. The city is named for Pomona, the ancient Roman goddess of fruit. For Horticulturist Solomon Gates, “Pomona” was the winning entry in a contest to name the city in 1875, before anyone had ever planted a fruit tree. The city was first settled by Ricardo Vejar and Ygnacio Palomares in the 1830s, when California and much of the now-American Southwest were part of Mexico. The first Anglo-Americans arrived in prior to 1848 when the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo resulted in California becoming part of the United States. By the 1880s, the arrival of railroads and Coachella Valley water had made it the western anchor of the citrus-growing region. Pomona was officially incorporated on January 6, 1888. Religious institutions are deeply embedded in the history of Pomona. There are now more than 120 churches, representing most religions in today’s society. The historical architecture of these churches provide glimpses of the European church design and architecture from other eras.